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50 Rarely-Seen Candid Photographs of President Theodore Roosevelt From the Early 20th Century

Theodore Roosevelt is mostly remembered as the twenty-sixth President of the United States, but this dynamic, multi-talented, charismatic man became a hero to millions of Americans for many other reasons. By the time he rose to the presidency at age 42—still the youngest person ever to hold the office—Roosevelt already had served as a New York State Assemblyman, a deputy sheriff in the Dakota Territory, Police Commissioner of New York City, U.S. Civil Service Commissioner, Assistant Secretary of the Navy, Colonel of the Rough Riders, Governor of New York, and Vice President.

When Theodore Roosevelt became president of the U.S. in 1901 America’s society and economy were changing rapidly, and with his energy and visionary leadership he set the maturing nation on the path to prosperous growth and diplomatic influence that would last throughout the 20th Century. By the time he left office in March 1909, Roosevelt also had changed forever the influence and scope of the presidency.

Towards the end of his life, Roosevelt was a major voice for military preparedness. He died at the age of 60 on January 6, 1919, at his home, Sagamore Hill, in Oyster Bay, New York. Criticized as a militarist, egotist, and political opportunist, Roosevelt's greatness has been debated, but his importance in American history is as obvious as his face on Mount Rushmore. Much of what he achieved affects Americans everyday and his name and personality have become icons for what America stands for at its best.

President Theodore Roosevelt on Dexter Avenue, in Montgomery, Alabama, 1905.

On May 6, 1903, President Theodore Roosevelt delivered a speech at the Grand Canyon in Arizona asking the citizens not to change the land, but to keep it for future generations to see.

The men in the photograph are, from left to right, William Loeb, Jr., Secretary to the President, Alexander Oswald Brodie, Governor of the Territory of Arizona, and President Theodore Roosevelt. On May 6, 1903, President Theodore Roosevelt delivered a speech at the Grand Canyon in Arizona asking the citizens not to change the land, but to keep it for future generations to see.

On May 19, 1903, President Theodore Roosevelt delivered a speech in Truckee, California.

On May 19, 1903, President Theodore Roosevelt delivered a speech in Truckee, California.

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This post first appeared on Egomania & Dipshittery, please read the originial post: here

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50 Rarely-Seen Candid Photographs of President Theodore Roosevelt From the Early 20th Century

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