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Kitsault : Reviving a ghost town

The town was briefly a bustling community of around 1200 people but now the streets are silent

Town was a bustling community of around 1200 people but now the streets are empty

The town had been conceived by mining company Amax Canada to attract workers to the remote north of British Columbia, near the border with Alaska, to mine molybdenum.

Molybdenum is known for its hardness and corrosion resistance and its so hard it was commonly used in the nose cones of rockets during the arms race.

Not less than 100 single-family homes and duplexes, seven apartment buildings with a total of 202 suites were built to accommodate workers in the town, 1400 km north of Vancouver.

There is also a modern hospital, shopping centre, restaurants, banks, a theatre and a post office.

As well as houses, there were also modern apartment blocks built in the town but they all stand empty

The idea was to lure workers from other parts of Canada to work mining molybdenum with attractive accommodation

Although molybdenum was heavily in demand at the time, sadly, soon after Kitsault was built, the price collapsed and the town was abandoned as quickly as it was settled.

After the town was abandoned by its 1200 inhabitants, the owners barred anyone from entering Kitsault so it became the town that time forgot.
The idea was to lure workers from other parts of Canada to work mining molybdenum with attractive accommodation

Kitsault which was built at a cost of $50 million in 1980 was bought in 2005 for $7 million by Indian-born, American entrepreneur Krishnan Suthanthiran, who set up the Kitsault resorts company to channel his aspirations.


This post first appeared on BEULALANDBLOG, please read the originial post: here

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Kitsault : Reviving a ghost town

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