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Joanna D’Arc: The girl who saved France

Joanna D' Arc the girl who saved France

Joanna D’Arc was born in Dorthey, Lorraine, in a poor family, with a father, who was a small farmer and with her four other siblings. Three girls and two boys. Her mother, Isabella, was a woman with an extremely strong personality, who had a decisive influence on Joanna.

The first visions

In the summer of 1424, Ioanna saw the first vision. A dream that flew in front of her without her being able to interpret the phenomenon. As time went by, the voices became clearer and able to distinguish the voice of Archangel Michael and then more voices, as the voices of Saint Catherine and St. Margarita.

The message of those was clear: God had chosen her for an important mission, and soon this mission would be revealed to her. In 1428, at the age of 16, the voices told her that she had to go to the court of the King of France. She left her house, pretending she was going to a pregnant cousin, and after being admitted by the governor of the city, she tried to persuade him to help her go to the imperial court. But in the mood. She threatened to imprison her, so she was forced to return home. In October 1428, the siege of Orleans began by the English. If Orleans fell into the hands of the English, there was no hope for France. This time Ioanna was determined to reach the imperial court.

He arrived in 1429 in the courtyard of the King, passing between courtiers and aristocrats. The King was hidden in the crowd and left a young flute in his place. Joanna had not seen the king again but went on crossing the crowd and kneeling in front of him, asking to allow her to lead the campaign against the English. She told the King that she was the envoy of the King of the Heavens. The king was impressed that she recognizes him, while she had never seen him before, and he accepted her request.

In April 1429, Ioanna, with the accompaniment of the Duke of Alanson, was placed a head of an army to solve the siege of Orleans. Together with her modesty, her perseverance and her purity persuaded those who were with her that she was the Messenger of God. When she tried to solve the siege of Orleans, everyone was convinced that the young girl was a saint.

With Joanna as the chief of the army, the major cities returned to French sovereignty, while with her own decisive contribution, Delphinus was crowned a legitimate King of France. However, in the battle for the conquest of Paris, Ioanna, who bravely fought with the Ducas of Alanson beside her, but could not prevail.

The captivity and the horrible death

Jeanne_d'Arc_burned

Jeanne_d’Arc_burned

On May 23, 1430, Joanna was captured by the Burgundian army and sold to the English for an insignificant skirmish. The English wanted to get rid of a woman, who was responsible for the successive defeats of recent years.

They went to Joanna from a trial that lasted for five whole months, accusing her of being a heretic and a witch, because of her visions. The verdict that was previously decided, was dead in the fire.

Ioanna was burned alive with the mournful crowd that a long time before she was deprived of her death with a cry of mourning and pleasure. When all was over, the executioners threw the heart and liver of Joanna, who had remained intact in the Seine.

Ioanna, starting from a formal village in the French province, changed the flow of history. She was a saint, a warrior, a mother-in-law, a 16-year-old girl who followed the course that her purpose was born for: She gave the French their lost pride and their lost lands.

And she reach it, even though people and history rewarded it in the most intimate way.

The post Joanna D’Arc: The girl who saved France appeared first on MottoCosmos.com.



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