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Watch: Russian Warship Closes On US Navy Cruiser

Russian Warship Closes on USS Chancellorsville

A Russian destroyer came within 100 feet of a U.S. cruiser operating in the Western Pacific in an incident the U.S. Navy is calling, “unsafe and unprofessional.”

USS Chancellorsville (CG-62) was attempting to recover a helicopter when it was approached by a Udaloy-class destroyer, according to a Friday statement from 7th Fleet.

“While Chancellorsville was recovering its helicopter on a steady course and speed when the Russian ship DD572 maneuvered from behind and to the right of Chancellorsville accelerated and closed to an unsafe distance of ~50-100 feet. This unsafe action forced Chancellorsville to execute all engines back full and to maneuver to avoid collision,” read the statement.

Russian Warship Closes on USS Chancellorsville

Image Credits: usni.org

“We consider Russia’s actions during this interaction as unsafe and unprofessional and not in accordance with the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (COLREGS), ‘Rules of the Road,’ and internationally recognized maritime customs.”

The statement from 7th Fleets follows reports in the Russian state-controlled press that Chancellorsville had in fact cut in front of the ship they identified as Admiral Vinogradov.

“The U.S. cruiser Chancellorsville suddenly changed its course and crossed the Admiral Vinogradov destroyer’s course some 50 meters away from the ship,” read the statement from the Russian military. “In order to prevent a collision, the Admiral Vinogradov’s crew was forced to conduct an emergency maneuver.”

The incident occurred about 350 miles east of Taiwan and 200 miles southwest Okinawa, Japan in the Philippine Sea, according to information provided by the Navy.

Russian officials on social media channels have said the incident occurred in the South China Sea.

The Friday incident wouldn’t be the first time Washington and Moscow have been split on at sea incidents.

In 2016, Russian and U.S. officials offered conflicting accounts on an incident between Russian Navy frigate Yaroslav Mudry (FF-777) and the guided-missile cruier USS San Jacinto (CG-56). Mudry multiple erratic maneuvers near the cruiser while coming within 150 yards of carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) during flight operations. Days earlier, the same Russian frigate had published a video edited in a way that seemed to show guided-missile destroyer USS Gravely (DDG-107) cut in front of it.

The Friday incident in the Pacific follows an unsafe aircraft interaction between a U.S. Navy P-8A Poseidon and a Russian Sukhoi Su-35 fighter.

At approximately 11:45 am on June 7, 2019 while operating in the Philippine Sea, a Russian destroyer (Udaloy I DD 572) made an unsafe maneuver against USS Chancellorsville (CG-62), closing to ~50-100 feet putting the safety of her crew and ship at risk.

While Chancellorsville was recovering its helicopter on a steady course and speed when the Russian ship DD572 maneuvered from behind and to the right of Chancellorsville accelerated and closed to an unsafe distance of ~50-100 feet. This unsafe action forced Chancellorsville to execute all engines back full and to maneuver to avoid collision.

We consider Russia’s actions during this interaction as unsafe and unprofessional and not in accordance with the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (COLREGS), “Rules of the Road,” and internationally recognized maritime customs.

Click to view the updated post with additional imagery and a map of where the incident occurred.

Reference: usni.org

NOTE: Marine Insight does not have enough information to verify this video and cannot vouch for its accuracy. This video is for information purpose only.

Marine Insight does not own the rights of the video.

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This post first appeared on Marine Insight - The Maritime Industry Guide, please read the originial post: here

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Watch: Russian Warship Closes On US Navy Cruiser

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