Get Even More Visitors To Your Blog, Upgrade To A Business Listing >>

LMPD cop who obtained search warrant that led to Breonna Taylor's death could be charged next

The Louisville police officer who obtained the ‘no-knock’ Search Warrant that led cops to Breonna Taylor’s home could be the next to potentially face charges as the police department and FBI launches an investigation into the case.  

LMPD Detective Joshua Jaynes was identified as the officer who had requested a Search Warrant to Taylor’s apartment hours before her death on March 12, in pursuit of her ex-boyfriend and drug suspect Jamarcus Glover. 

Cops later carried out the raid in the early hours of March 13, bursting through the door and killing the 26-year-old EMT in a hail of bullets as she stood alongside her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker. 

Meanwhile Glover, who was the intended target of the warrant, had already been taken into custody around the same time of the operation, ten miles away. 

LMPD Detective Joshua Jaynes (pictured) requested a search warrant to Taylor's apartment hours before her death on March 12, in pursuit of her ex-boyfriend and drug suspect Jamarcus Glover (right)
Glover was already in custody by the time Louisville officers killed Taylor in a hail of bullets

LMPD Detective Joshua Jaynes (left) requested a search warrant to Taylor’s apartment hours before her death on March 12, in pursuit of her ex-boyfriend and drug suspect Jamarcus Glover (right). Glover was already in custody by the time Louisville officers killed Taylor in a hail of bullets

Taylor, 26, was killed alongside her boyfriend Kenneth Walker (right) after cops barged into her apartment while executing a search warrant targeting Glover

Taylor, 26, was killed alongside her boyfriend Kenneth Walker (right) after cops barged into her apartment while executing a search warrant targeting Glover 

Jaynes, who was not present during the raid, was placed on administrative reassignment in June after the department launched an investigation into how the controversial warrant was obtained. 

Although the officers had been widely reported to have executed the warrant without knocking, it has since been revealed the cops did indeed bang on the door before entering.

However, questions still remain over why cops were allowed to execute the warrant at a residence where the intended target did not live.  

During a news conference addressing a grand jury’s report on the case on Wednesday, Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron said the AG’s office’s investigation did not include the attainment of the warrant. 

He confirmed that investigation is currently being carried out by federal law enforcement partners who are looking into potential violations of federal law. 

Cameron also announced he would soon sign an executive order ‘in coming days’ to create a task force that will review the process for securing, reviewing and executing search warrants in the state.

‘I believe conducting a top to bottom review of the search warrant process is necessary to determine if changes are required and establish best practices,’ Cameron told reporters. 

In the early hours of March 13, Louisville police officers entered apartment 4 of 3003 Springfield Drive, firing 32 times. Breonna Taylor was shot six times, but only one was determined to be fatal

In the early hours of March 13, Louisville police officers entered apartment 4 of 3003 Springfield Drive, firing 32 times. Breonna Taylor was shot six times, but only one was determined to be fatal 

Bullet holes and blood smeared on the walls could be seen in one evidence photo from inside Taylor's apartment after she was shot dead

Bullet holes and blood smeared on the walls could be seen in one evidence photo from inside Taylor’s apartment after she was shot dead

Authorities have not confirmed if Jaynes or any other officers are subjects in the federal probe. DailyMail.com has contacted the LMPD for comment. 

Cameron said the three officers involved in the March 13 raid, Sergeant Jonathan Mattingly and detectives Myles Cosgrove and Brett Hankison were not involved in obtaining the search warrant.  

He said the three ‘were called into duty as the extra personnel to effectuate the service of the search warrant.’

‘They only had information conveyed to them in their prior briefing. They knocked and announced their presence at the apartment,’ Cameron said.  

The LMPD on Tuesday confirmed Jaynes is one of six officers being investigated for violating department policies in a probe led by the department’s Professional Standards Unit.

Authorities did not say which potential violations they were investigating.  

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron said he will soon sign an executive order to create a task force that will review the process for securing and executing search warrants in the state

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron said he will soon sign an executive order to create a task force that will review the process for securing and executing search warrants in the state

According to earlier reports, Jaynes had requested a warrant in an affidavit saying he was targeting a suspect believed to be in a ‘trap house’ that was more than 10 miles away from Taylor’s house. 

Only later was it revealed that the drug suspect they were looking for was already in custody by the time Louisville officers killed Taylor. 

In his request, Jaynes said the no-knock warrant was necessary because ‘drug traffickers have a history of attempting to destroy evidence, have cameras on the location that compromise Detectives once an approach to the dwelling is made, and have a history of fleeing from law enforcement.’

The controversial ‘no-knock’ warrant was signed on March 12 by Jefferson Circuit Judge Mary Shaw.  

Fired Louisville detective Brett Hankison was charged with three counts of wanton endangerment in connection to the police raid on the night of March 13

Fired Louisville detective Brett Hankison (left) was charged with three counts of wanton endangerment in connection to the police raid that killed Breonna Taylor (right) on the night of March 13 

Cops claimed that a US postal inspector ‘verified’ that Glover was receiving packages at Taylor’s home, but Louisville inspector Tony Gooden said Louisville police did not ask his office to conduct that investigation, but a different agency did. 

He said the local office concluded no potentially suspicious mail was being sent to Taylor’s apartment. 

Jaynes wrote in the warrant that drug suspect Jamarcus Glover, made ‘frequent trips’ to Taylor’s home and had been receiving packages there. 

He wrote he believed Glover may be ‘keeping narcotics and/or proceeds from the sale of narcotics’ at Taylor’s apartment. 

The warrant was to search for drugs, money, weapons, ‘paperwork that may be a record of narcotic sales’ and any electronic records as evidence of drug trafficking.

In the end nothing illegal was found in Taylor’s home. 

A Jefferson County grand jury on Wednesday announced its decision to indict former detective Brett Hankison on three counts of wanton endangerment in connection to the fatal shooting of Taylor. 

The other two cops involved, Sgt Jonathan Mattingly and Detective Myles Cosgrove, were not charged.  

Myles Cosgrove
John Mattingly

Officers Myles Cosgrove (left) and John Mattingly (right) who were present during the police raid on March 13, were not charged on Wednesday. Hankison was fired from the LMPD while the other two officers were placed on administrative assignment 

Source link

The post LMPD cop who obtained search warrant that led to Breonna Taylor's death could be charged next appeared first on Angle News.



This post first appeared on Angle News, please read the originial post: here

Share the post

LMPD cop who obtained search warrant that led to Breonna Taylor's death could be charged next

×

Subscribe to Angle News

Get updates delivered right to your inbox!

Thank you for your subscription

×