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Stage are used for non-small cell lung cancer

Stage are used for non-small cell lung cancer There are a number of varieties of non-small cell lung cancer. Smoking will increase the chance of non-small cell lung cancer. Indicators of non-small cell lung most cancers embrace a cough that does not go away and shortness of breath. Assessments that study the lungs are used to detect (discover), diagnose, and stage non-small cell lung most cancers.

non-small cell lung cancer

non-small cell lung cancer

Stages are used for non-small cell lung cancer

Occult (hidden) stage

In the occult (hidden) stage, cancer cannot be seen by imaging or bronchoscopy. Cancer cells are found in sputum (mucus coughed up from the lungs) or bronchial washing (a sample of cells taken from inside the airways that lead to the lung). Cancer may have Spread to other parts of the body.

Stage I

ENLARGE Two-panel drawing of stage I non-small cell lung cancer. First panel shows stage IA with cancer (3 cm or less) in the right lung; also shown are the right main bronchus, trachea, lymph nodes, bronchioles,

Stage 1

Stage 1

and diaphragm. Second panel shows stage IB with cancer (more than 3 cm but not more than 5 cm) in the left lung
and in the left main bronchus; the carina is also shown. Inset shows cancer that has spread from the lung into the innermost layer of the lung lining; a rib is also shown.
Stage I non-small cell lung cancer. In stage IA, cancer is in the lung only and is 3 cm or smaller. In stage IB, the cancer is (a) larger than 3 cm but not larger than 5 cm, (b) has spread to the main bronchus, and/or (c) has spread to the innermost layer of the lung lining. Part of the lung may have collapsed or become inflamed (not shown).

In stage I, cancer has formed. Stage I is divided into stages IA and IB

Stage IA: The tumor is in the lung only and is 3 centimeters or smaller.
Stage IB: Cancer has not spread to the lymph nodes and one or more of the following is true: The tumor is larger than 3 centimeters but not larger than 5 centimeters. Cancer has spread to the main bronchus and is at least 2 centimeters below where the trachea joins the bronchus. Cancer has spread to the innermost layer of the membrane that covers the lung. Part of the lung has collapsed or developed pneumonitis (inflammation of the lung) in the area where the trachea joins the bronchus.

Stage II

Stage II is divided into stages IIA and IIB. Stage IIA and IIB are each divided into two sections depending on the size of the tumor, where the tumor is found, and whether there is cancer in the lymph nodes.

Stage IIA:

ENLARGETwo-panel drawing of stage IIA non-small cell lung cancer. First panel shows cancer (5 cm or less), and cancer in the right main bronchus and lymph nodes; also shown are the trachea, bronchioles, and diaphragm. Second panel shows cancer (more than 5 cm but not more than 7 cm),

Stage II

Stage II

and cancer in the left main bronchus; also shown are the trachea, lymph nodes, bronchioles, and diaphragm. Insets show cancer that has spread from the lung into the innermost layer of the lung lining; a rib is also shown.
Stage IIA non-small cell lung cancer. Cancer has spread to certain lymph nodes on the same side of the chest as the primary tumor; the cancer is (a) 5 cm or smaller, (b) has spread to the main bronchus, and/or (c) has spread to the innermost layer of the lung lining. OR, cancer has not spread to lymph nodes; the cancer is (d) larger than 5 cm but not larger than 7 cm, (e) has spread to the main bronchus, and/or (f) has spread to the innermost layer of the lung lining. Part of the lung may have collapsed or become inflamed (not shown).(1) Cancer has spread to lymph nodes on the same side of the chest as the tumor. The lymph nodes with cancer are within the lung or near the bronchus. Also, one or more of the following is true:

The tumor is not larger than 5 centimeters. Cancer has spread to the main bronchus and is at least 2 centimeters below where the trachea joins the bronchus. Cancer has spread to the innermost layer of the membrane that covers the lung. Part of the lung has collapsed or developed pneumonitis (inflammation of the lung) in the area where the trachea joins the bronchus.
or (2) Cancer has not spread to lymph nodes and one or more of the following is true:

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The tumor is larger than 5 centimeters but not larger than 7 centimeters.
Cancer has spread to the main bronchus and is at least 2 centimeters below where the trachea joins the bronchus. Cancer has spread to the innermost layer of the membrane that covers the lung. Part of the lung has collapsed or developed pneumonitis (inflammation of the lung) in the area where the trachea joins the bronchus.

Stage IIB:

ENLARGETwo-panel drawing of stage IIB non-small cell lung cancer. First panel shows cancer (more than 5 cm but not more than 7 cm), and cancer in the right main bronchus and lymph nodes; also shown are the trachea, bronchioles, and diaphragm. Inset shows cancer that has spread from the lung to the innermost layer of the lung lining; a rib is also shown. Second panel shows cancer (more than 7 cm), and cancer in the left main bronchus; also shown are the trachea, lymph nodes, bronchioles, and diaphragm. Top inset shows cancer that has spread from the lung through the lung lining and chest wall lining into the chest wall; a rib is also shown.
Bottom inset shows the heart and cancer that has spread from the lung into the membrane around the heart.

Stage IIB non-small cell lung cancer. Cancer has spread to certain lymph nodes on the same side of the chest as the primary tumor; the cancer is (a) larger than 5 cm but not larger than 7 cm, (b) has spread to the main bronchus, and/or (c) has spread to the innermost layer of the lung lining. Part of the lung may have collapsed or become inflamed (not shown). OR, (d) the cancer is larger than 7 cm; (e) has spread to the main bronchus, (f) the diaphragm, (g) the chest wall or the lining of the chest wall; and/or (h) has spread to the membrane around the heart. There may be one or more separate tumors in the same lobe of the lung; cancer may have
spread to the nerve that controls the diaphragm; the whole lung may have collapsed or become inflamed (not shown)

(1) Cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes on the same side of the chest as the tumor. The lymph nodes with cancer are within the lung or near the bronchus. Also, one or more of the following is true: The tumor is larger than 5 centimeters but not larger than 7 centimeters. Cancer has spread to the main bronchus and is at least 2 centimeters below where the trachea joins the bronchus.stage III
Cancer has spread to the innermost layer of the membrane that covers the lung.
Part of the lung has collapsed or developed pneumonitis (inflammation of the lung) in the area where the trachea joins the bronchus. or (2) Cancer has not spread to lymph nodes and one or more of the following is true

The tumor is larger than 7 centimeters. Cancer has spread to the main bronchus (and is less than 2 centimeters below where the trachea joins the  bronchus), the chest wall, the diaphragm, or the nerve that controls the diaphragm. Cancer has spread to the membrane around the heart or lining the chest wall. The whole lung has collapsed or developed pneumonitis (inflammation of the lung). There are one or more separate tumors in the same lobe of the lung.

Stage IIIA

Stage IIIA is divided into three sections depending on the size of the tumor, where the tumor is found, and which lymph nodes have cancer (if any).

ENLARGE Stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (1). Drawing shows cancer in lymph nodes, left main bronchus, and diaphragm; there may be separate tumors in the same lung; the trachea is also shown. Top inset shows cancer that has spread from the lung through the lung lining and chest wall lining into the chest wall; a rib is also shown. Bottom inset shows the heart and cancer that has spread from the lung into the membrane around the heart.

Stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (1). Cancer has spread to certain lymph nodes on the same side of the chest as the primary tumor. The cancer may have spread to (a) the main bronchus; (b) lung lining, chest wall lining, or chest wall; (c) diaphragm; and/or (d) membrane around the heart; and/or (e) there may be one or more separate tumors in the same lobe of the lung. Cancer may have spread to the nerve that controls the diaphragm, and part or all of the lung may have collapsed or become inflamed (not shown).
(1) Cancer has spread to lymph nodes on the same side of the chest as the tumor. The lymph nodes with cancer are near the sternum (chest bone) or where the bronchus enters the lung. Also: The tumor may be any size.
Part of the lung (where the trachea joins the bronchus) or the whole lung may have collapsed or developed pneumonitis (inflammation of the lung). There may be one or more separate tumors in the same lobe of the lung. Cancer may have spread to any of the following: Main bronchus, but not the area where the trachea joins the bronchus.
Chest wall.
Diaphragm and the nerve that controls it. Membrane around the lung or lining the chest wall. Membrane around the heart. or ENLARGE Stage IIIA lung cancer (2). Drawing shows cancer in the lymph nodes, trachea, carina, left main bronchus, esophagus, sternum, diaphragm, and major blood vessels that lead to or from the heart; there may be separate tumors in the same lung. Top inset shows cancer that has spread from the lung through the lung lining and chest wall lining into the chest wall; a rib is also shown. Bottom inset shows cancer that has spread from the lung, through the membrane around the heart, into the heart.
Stage IIIA lung cancer (2). Cancer has spread to certain lymph nodes on the same side of the chest as the primary tumor. The cancer may have spread to (a) the main bronchus; (b) the lung lining, chest wall lining, or chest wall; (c) diaphragm; (d) heart and/or membrane around the it; (e) major blood vessels that lead to or from the heart; (f) trachea; (g) esophagus; (h) sternum; and/or (i) carina; and/or (j) there may be one or more separate tumors in any lobe of the same lung. Cancer may have spread to the nerves that control the diaphragm and larynx, and the whole lung may have collapsed or become inflamed (not shown).
(2) Cancer has spread to lymph nodes on the same side of the chest as the tumor. The lymph nodes with cancer are within the lung or near the bronchus. Also:

The tumor may be any size.
The whole lung may have collapsed or developed pneumonitis (inflammation of the lung). There may be one or more separate tumors in any of the lobes of the lung with cancer. Cancer may have spread to any of the following: Main bronchus, but not the area where the trachea joins the bronchus. Chest wall.
Diaphragm and the nerve that controls it.
Membrane around the lung or lining the chest wall.
Heart or the membrane around it.
Major blood vessels that lead to or from the heart.
Trachea.
Esophagus.
Nerve that controls the larynx (voice box).
Sternum (chest bone) or backbone.
Carina (where the trachea joins the bronchi).
or

ENLARGE Stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (3). Drawing shows cancer in the heart, major blood vessels that lead to or from the heart, the trachea, esophagus, sternum, and carina; the diaphragm is also shown. Inset shows cancer that has spread from the lung, through the membrane around the heart, into the heart.
Stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (3). Cancer has spread to (a) the heart; (b) major blood vessels that lead to or from the heart; (c) trachea; (d) esophagus; (e) sternum; and/or (f) carina. Cancer may have spread to the nerve that controls the larynx (not shown).
(3) Cancer has not spread to the lymph nodes and the tumor may be any size. Cancer has spread to any of the following:

Heart.
Major blood vessels that lead to or from the heart.
Trachea.
Esophagus.
Nerve that controls the larynx (voice box).
Sternum (chest bone) or backbone.
Carina (where the trachea joins the bronchi).

Stage IV

ENLARGE Stage IV non-small cell lung cancer; drawing shows other parts of the body where lung cancer may spread, including the other lung, brain, lymph nodes, adrenal gland, kidney, liver, and bone. An inset shows cancer cells spreading from the lung, through the blood and lymph system, to another part of the body where
metastatic cancer has formed.

stage IV

stage IV

Stage IV non-small cell lung cancer. The cancer has spread to the other lung, and/or to lymph nodes, fluid around the lungs or heart, and/or other parts of the body, such as the brain, liver, adrenal gland, kidney, or bone.
In stage IV, the tumor may be any size and cancer may have spread to lymph nodes. One or more of the following is true:

There are one or more tumors in both lungs.
Cancer is found in fluid around the lungs or the heart.
Cancer has spread to other parts of the body, such as the brain, liver, adrenal glands, kidneys, or bone. Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Recurrent non-small cell lung cancer is cancer that has recurred (come back) after it has been treated. The cancer may come back in the brain, lung, or other parts of the body.

The post Stage are used for non-small cell lung cancer appeared first on The Health Stuff.



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