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Male factor infertility – Dealing with Infertility When “HE” Has the Issue-Reasons for Male Infertility

Male Factor Infertility – Symptoms, Diagnosis And Treatment

When couples experience infertility, there’s often a misconception that the problem is the women. But, actually each group is responsible for 40 percent of infertility, and the rest is attributable to a combination of both male and female factors or unexplained reasons. Therefore, it’s important to have both partners’ fertility checked if you’re having trouble getting pregnant.

If a malefactor is what’s making it tough for you and your partner to conceive, it’s important to understand what may be causing his infertility.

Dealing with Male Infertility

Dealing with Male Infertility

What is male infertility?

“Male infertility is a condition in which the male reproductive tract and Sperm have diminished the capacity to lead to the eventual fertilization of the egg to produce an embryo. For a healthy semen report, sperm count should be at least 20 million / ml with a minimum 50% of sperms having rapid progressive motility.

There are 2 types of a Severe degree of male infertility, in which sperm count is very very low (almost uncountable) or there are no sperms in the semen sample.

1.Non-obstructive azoospermia, which means the testicle is not producing any sperm or is producing sperm in such low quantities that it cannot be detected in a standard semen analysis.

2. Obstructive azoospermia, in which sperm is produced, but cannot be discharged doesn’t come out because of an obstruction.

What is male infertility?

Male infertility and Sperm

What causes male infertility?

The following are common causes of male factor infertility:

Structural abnormalities that partially or totally block the flow of sperm and/or seminal fluid. Men may be born with abnormalities or the abnormalities may result from infection or surgery.

Sperm production disorders, when the production of sperm is inhibited. This may happen in men who have had a vasectomy or who have a varicocele that may cause low sperm count and decreased sperm quality.

Ejaculatory disturbances, such as impotence or retrograde ejaculation that prevent sperms to reach the woman.

Immunologic disorders, like endocrine disorders or antisperm antibodies that prevent sperm from meeting and successfully penetrating the egg in the woman’s genital tract.

What is male infertility?

What causes male infertility?

How is male infertility diagnosed?

Male infertility is usually diagnosed through a semen analysis, and for the most part, abnormalities are associated with the sperm. The sample will be tested for a volume of ejaculation, sperm concentration, sperm motility (how well sperm moves), and sperm morphology (the size and shape of the sperm).

Semen analysis and sperm counts aren’t the most enticing topics of conversation for most men, but if you’re having trouble conceiving, you may need to have “the talk” with your guy.

Azoospermia is defined as the complete lack of sperm in the ejaculate

Azoospermia is defined as the complete lack of sperm in the ejaculate

How is male infertility treated?

Often, an exact cause of infertility can’t be identified. Even if an exact cause isn’t clear, your doctor might be able to recommend treatments or procedures that will result in conception.Treatments for male infertility includes Surgery – Treating infections – Hormone treatments and medications.

Assisted reproductive technology (ART) – ART treatments involve obtaining sperm through normal ejaculation, surgical extraction or from donor individuals, depending on your specific case and wishes. The sperm is then inserted into the female genital tract or used to perform in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

The journey to parenthood is different for everyone. If you and your partner are unable to conceive, there are many other ways to create your family. Options include egg or sperm donation, surrogacy, in vitro fertilization. Be sure to discuss these possibilities and any next steps with our fertility specialist.

  • Infertility Treatment Clinic
  • Gynaecology & Obstetrics Clinic
  • Hysterectomy & Laparoscopy Clinic
  • Menopause clinic


This post first appeared on Rupal Hospital For Women, please read the originial post: here

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Male factor infertility – Dealing with Infertility When “HE” Has the Issue-Reasons for Male Infertility

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