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Indigenous Healing: Sunchoke

With the current interest in indigenous foods, Sunchoke tops the list for being hardy, prolific and nutritious. Sunchoke: Native Sunflower and Food Jerusalem Artichoke By Chris Anderson A few Jerusalem artichokes or Sunchoke (Helianthus tuberosus) go a long way. A friend gave me nine small tubers about 12 years ago that has grown into a harvest of several five-gallon buckets worth of food each fall. Also known as sunroot, sunchoke, and earth apple, these hardy little tubers are neither artichokes nor are they from Jerusalem. They are in the aster family and a native sunflower, with the genus name from the Greek words Helios meaning sun and anthos for the flower. Tuberous is from Latin meaning tuberous referring to the edible roots. Sunchoke is a native plant which grows with exuberance in well-drained soil and unless every small tuber is harvested in the fall, will continue to spread, sprouting the following spring. Their strong growth habit is well-suited for areas with plenty of room to expand, intermixed with other native plantings or planted on slopes for which soil stabilization is needed. As a wild plant, they can be found growing along old railroads, in fields, and along roadsides. With the current and very exciting interest in indigenous foods, Sunchoke or Jerusalem artichokes top the list for being hardy, prolific and nutritious. They are similar to potatoes and have a fresh, healthy “earthy” flavor and have been cultivated by Native American Indians for centuries from the First Nations in the northeast to the Seminole in the South and as far west as traditional Kiowa and Paiute lands. They look like knobby little potatoes or ginger root with a white flesh covered in a thin brown skin. With a taste like crisp water chestnuts or fresh jicama, they can be sliced thin...

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This post first appeared on OMTimes Magazine - Co-Creating A More Conscious Li, please read the originial post: here

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Indigenous Healing: Sunchoke

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