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Mojácar Had its Quiet Times, Too!

Mojácar back in 1960 was a pile of Rubble. Few people lived here - maybe not more than 600, a far cry from the 8,000 of the 'twenties. The Civil War was one cause for Mojácar's collapse, people Left (hurriedly) as Mojácar was Republican (communist) during the terrible struggle that assailed Spain. Some 'fascists' were murdered - the priest, the bank manager and so on, and others left for the Nationalist lines. After the war, the Francoists had their revenge. More people left - often heading for South America. They would demolish their homes, to sell the roof-beams, the lintels, the doors and the rejas... any money they could raise. They had no plans to return.
In the fifties, the impoverished village - Franco didn't like Almeria - survived as best it could, eating poorly, including flour sent by the Civil Governor - flour for animal use. The water table had fallen, and the subsistence agriculture had all but disappeared.
In 1960, Jacinto Alarcon was the mayor. He had some ideas. Most or all paperwork, escrituras and so on was lost, if they had ever existed. Jacinto began the idea of giving homes - ruins - to anyone who would repair them. Many took him up and maintained a home in the village - there were even a few ambassadors among the new and enthusiastic strangers to the town. Clearing away rubble, it was sometimes impossible to even know where the streets ran. The town was re-invented. A few Mojaqueros who lost what they considered to be their properties, were consoled to find they could build on other bits of land they owned. There was no Junta de Andalucía to interfere.
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One Mojáquero family, in the early sixties, was persuaded to sell land to the State, as Jacinto had talked the Minister for Tourism in Madrid into giving Mojácar a chance. The land, with sea views, was sold for one real per metre to what would eventually become The Parador Hotel, built in 1964. In modern terms - the land cost 666 square metres per one euro. Three euros for 2000 metres.
Man, Mojácar was cheap in those days!



This post first appeared on The Entertainer Online, please read the originial post: here

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Mojácar Had its Quiet Times, Too!

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