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An eye for an eye funding by Shaun Weldon


In response to Hannah's post on funding, I see it as “an eye for an eye” when it comes to government funding. There’s a lot of packages and programs that could work, would work, but are denied funding because although beneficial it could be seen as dead money as they won't get anything in return. Why contribute to a cause that provides to people who are in prison costing them money anyway? Inmates will only get involved because there's nothing else to do, it won't rehabilitate. Wrong, the government fail to see that the packages and programs not only give inmates something to do, it gives them something to put their mind to, something that will help shape the way they think and do. Back in my school days there were always those pupils at the back of the class who didn't bother doing their work because they didn't know how, so they adopted this “what's the point” attitude, they would sooner disrupt the rest of the class out of boredom. With focused attention from a teacher these pupils discovered that with a bit of direction and putting their mind to their work, they could do it and better than they thought they could. This achievement pushed them to try, to do. I refer to school and the disruptive pupils because in effect it's similar to what goes on in prisons. Inmates aren’t up to much and are bored, so disruption is the perfect boredom cure. Funding things for inmates to do could lead to a reduction of disruption by giving them something to put their minds to and focus on. Now, millions of people worldwide dish out words of encouragement like, “You can do anything if you put your mind to it”, and, “anything is possible if you believe in yourself, if you believe you can”. This drives the people on the receiving end of these words to put in the effort to achieve goals, some they didn't ever think they could head towards. This could be the case with crafts and distraction programs, giving people something to work on that they never thought they would ever be able to do. This in turn could have a snowball effect, driving them to do more, driving them to succeed in other areas. It could spark the belief in themselves that is needed to better themselves in life, just like the words of encouragement. It's all about opportunities and giving them the chance to thrive, to better themselves, to achieve. But of course, people bettering themselves isn't a priority in the eyes of the government because there's nothing in it for them, I bet they would sooner fund a gardening project for kids to vandalise.


This post first appeared on Prison Widow UK, please read the originial post: here

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An eye for an eye funding by Shaun Weldon

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