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Amazing Photographs Taken by Wallace G. Levison That Capture Everyday Life of New Yorkers at the Turn of the Century

Wallace G. Levison was a chemist, inventor, and lecturer who founded the Departments of Mineralogy and Astronomy at the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences in the latter half of the 19th century.

According to Mashable/Retronaut, he was also an avid photographer, using the new technology both as a scientific tool and a recreational activity.

As the dawn of the 20th century approached, newer, more sensitive film emulsions were developed that allowed pictures to be taken with faster and faster shutter speeds.

Levison’s photographs, snapped amid the hustling crowds of Manhattan and the frolicking bathers of Coney Island, display an obsession with motion and a delight with freezing actions that could previously only be recorded as a blur.

Nov. 6, 1884 - Crowds of men outside the New York Tribune building in lower Manhattan.

1886 - Uniformed officers in riding boots walk down a street.

May 10, 1886 - Nathan Abbott and a young girl walk through Copps Hill Cemetery.

May 22, 1886 - Girls jump off a stone wall in Fort Greene.

May 22, 1886 - Isabel Harter rides a tricycle while her sister Nellie rolls a hoop in Fort Greene.

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Amazing Photographs Taken by Wallace G. Levison That Capture Everyday Life of New Yorkers at the Turn of the Century

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