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Modern Art Monday Presents, René Magritte, The False Mirror

The False Mirror
Photo By Gail

Le Faux Miroir (1928) presents an enormous lash-less eye with a luminous cloud-swept blue sky filling the iris, and an opaque, dead-black disc for a pupil. The allusive title, provided by Belgian surrealist writer Paul Nougé, seems to insinuate limits to the authority of optical vision: a mirror provides a mechanical reflection, but the eye is selective and subjective. Magritte’s single eye functions on multiple enigmatic levels: the viewer both looks through it, as through a window, and is looked at by it, thus seeing and being seen simultaneously. The Surrealist photographer Man Ray, who owned the work from 1933 to 1936, recognized this compelling duality when he memorably described Le Faux Miroir as a painting that “sees as much as it itself is seen.”

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art n NYC.

Filed under: Uncategorized Tagged: 1928, Art, Artist, Belgian, EYE, Le Faux Miroir, Man Ray, Modern Art Monday, MOMA, Museum of Modern Art, Painting, Rene Magritte, Sky, The False Mirror

This post first appeared on The Worleygig | Pop Culture • Art • Music •, please read the originial post: here

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Modern Art Monday Presents, René Magritte, The False Mirror


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