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These Are The Best Food Trucks In Every Southwestern State


Bang Bite Filling Station/Facebook

On Monday, we began dropping the names of the best Food trucks across the U.S.. So far, we have labeled the Northeast, Southeast, and Midwest, which leaves us smackdab in the Southwest. You might think that we are now pros who assert the supremacy of mobile kitchens with the self-assurance of a young Kanye West. Or, you might (more accurately) assume that we bicker until all of our personal limits are reached, and then decide things with amateur freestyle wrestling

As we have moved west, making these picks has gotten harder and harder. First of all, these states all have big food scenes, but the more pressing issue is that they are huge. Texas is 221.7 times as large as Rhode Island. That’s exponentially more room to park a food truck, which means so many more options from which to choose. This is why Uproxx is thinking about reviving Texas divisionism. If splitting Texas into five states was good enough for random people in the 1850s, it’s good enough for people making lists about food trucks.

After you finish looking at all of the pictures of yummy food, jump in the comments and give us your opinions. We won’t make you wrestle for dominance.

Emerson Fry Bread/Facebook

Texas: Micklethwait Craft Meats (Austin)

Texas is a foodie destination, but it’s the city of Austin specifically that is most associated with the food truck revolution; there are more than 1,400 mobile food vendors registered to do business in Travis County. The city is also known for its mind-blowing smoked meats. Micklethwait Craft Meats combines the pair and throws out some of the best dishes in the state. Tom Micklethwait (an authentic Austinite) launched his business in December 2012, after quitting his job as a pastry chef at Vespaio, an Italian eatery on South Congress Avenue. Now, customers are lined up at the 1960 Comet trailer on E 11th Street for Texas barbeque and the finest gourmet sides in the game.

Micklethwait Craft Meat is famous for its sausages. Micklethwait makes all of them from scratch, but he never uses any recipes; he simply combines whatever sounds good. Duck with cherry and lamb with tangerine zest have made the menu, as has pork belly andouille. The kielbasa is a favorite of the craft meat guru, who uses a 50/50 blend of beef (hearts and all) and pork and seasons it with black pepper, fresh sage, cardamom, mace, coriander, mustard, allspice, and a lot of garlic. He makes the mustard from scratch; it’s used in the killer potato salad, along with chili sauce, dill, honey, vinegar, parsley, capers, and cooked egg yolks.

Expect brisket with Micklethwait’s signature rub cooked in the pit for 10-14 hours and given a long, slow rest. It’s tender and juicy, with perfect smoke rings marking the outside. Sop up juices and sauce using thick slices of house-baked white bread with an airy crumb. The coleslaw eschews mayo in favor of a zingy vinaigrette with lemon juice and zest, honey, mustard powder, vegetable oil, and poppy seeds. And, the desserts are exceptional.

Who doesn’t want a slice of buttermilk pie featuring a tangy, creamy custard against a backdrop of exceptionally buttery crust?

Oklahoma: The Saucee Sicilian (Oklahoma City)

Gannon Mendez had grown tired of working in the medical field when his mother, Nonna, suggested they open a food truck that served the classic Italian dishes they had been preparing for their family of 20 on a regular basis. Descendants of Lena Costanzo, who was born in Sicily in 1903 and later immigrated to the US, the pair had the authentic recipes they needed to prepare the best pizza in the region. To begin with, they thought selling 20 pizzas a day was the best that they could expect. The first day, they sold 50. Now, they dish up 1,500 to 1,700 each week. And, why wouldn’t they? The Saucee Sicilian is one of only two wood-fired oven pizzerias in the entire OKC area that cook using 100 percent wood (they favor hickory and pecan). They only use the freshest ingredients. And, they make everything from scratch. Their goal is to serve you the meal you would get in Nonna’s grandmother’s house.

The dough they work with is made with imported Italian flour, and the sauce uses Lena Costanzo’s recipe, which requires 48 hours to complete. Nonna mixes and hand rolls every one of the meatballs and she makes the Italian sausage they serve. Their other meats — capicola, soprassata, pepperoni, and prosciutto — arrive weekly from a cousin’s deli in New York, and every morning, they hand slice the pepperoni so customers get fresh meat. Though lines are often long and hungry, they move quickly because the pizzas only spend 90-120 seconds in the blistering oven; it’s Neapolitan style pizza.

The most popular pizza is the Tusa, made with mozzarella, Nonna’s house-made Italian sausage, hot soppressatta (Italian dry salami), hot capicola (spiced and smoked pork shoulder cured in natural casing), and fresh mushrooms. They infuse their sauce with Thai oil for added heat, so this is one spicy pie. The second biggest seller is the Palermo Pizza, featuring mozzarella, caramelized onions, and house-made pesto. But, their most popular item overall is their Sauce and Balls appetizer, a cup filled with 3 meatballs and scratch meat sauce; Nonna cooks the meat balls in the sauce for a full 24 hours before they are sold, making them melt in your mouth treats.

Check out the best food trucks of the midwest here!

New Mexico: Bang Bite Filling Station (Santa Fe)

Chef Enrique Guerrero has a culinary pedigree that includes working at famed restaurants like The French Laundry in California and Le Cirque in New York. He is best known in the Santa Fe area for the period he spent as the chef at La Macha inside the Galisteo Inn. During his tenor there, Bon Appetit called the restaurant one of the ten best dining experiences in a vacation destination.

Eventually, Guerrero grew bored with fine dining, and when his wife encouraged him to do something else, he opened Bang Bite Filling Station. Guerrerro acknowledges everything he cooks is “either immoral, illegal, or will make you fat.” One look at the menu backs up this assertion. This is decadent dining. The bright orange food truck sits in a lot off of Old Santa Fe Trail selling transcendent burgers, sammies, “things with cheese,” and sides. All of the burgers, sandwiches, and things with cheese come with a generous serving of hand cut, seasoned fries.

If you make a burger in Santa Fe, everyone expects green chiles. Bang Bite deviates from that expectation by offering the signature Bite Burger, which uses 100 percent certified Black Angus chuck, brisket, and short ribs to form the patties; the secret to its deliciousness is a mix of jalapeno, poblano, serrano, chipotle, and green chile blended right into the meat. Grilled to medium, the patty is placed on a toasted bun and topped with shredded lettuce, tomato, crispy bacon, melted pepper jack, and avocado. When it comes to condiments, you won’t find any ketchup or mustard on these burgers. Instead, Guerrero makes a variety of aioli, including morita (smoked jalapeno), jalapeno, and garlic. Bang Bite also makes a bacon maple jam that you can thankfully order as a side because you will need to put it on everything.

There are also specials. Recently, the truck offered a burger made with house pork chorizo, avocado, salsa fresca, and asadero cheese (rich Mexican melting cheese). And, on a #fishfriday, customers enjoyed a sammie with crispy fried soft shell crab, lettuce, tomato, scratch pickles, and a spicy bayou aioli.

Arizona: Emerson Fry Bread (Phoenix)

Fusion is a common food truck approach, and while there are Korean-Mexican joints in every state, there seems to only be one Native American-Mexican one in the country, and it is the pride of Phoenix, Arizona. Emerson Fry Bread opened in April of 2011, but it was not the first-time owner and operator Lorenzo Wilson had sold fry bread; his father and grandfather, who needed to finance their band, The Salt River Reservation Band, started doing it in 1967. In order to gather the funds needed to tour the southwest, the family started selling fry bread at the Arizona State Fair, and they kept it up until 2001.

The business’ newest incarnation is more than fry bread. Emerson, who is Quechen, Mojave, and Mexican-American, celebrates both his Native American and his Mexican heritage with the food. But, it is his wife Roxanne’s full-blooded Navajo, of the Water Edge Clan, heritage that best informs the frybread. It’s indigenous food with a gourmet sensibility.

Emerson Fry Bread places a lot of emphasis on fresh and house-made products. They make all of their salsas daily with produce that is local and organic when possible. Every morning, they roast the chilis needed for the day and prepare frybread dough. And, the juices they sell are also prepared by the couple. The Jazzy is an excellent example of their food. This Indian taco starts with a piece of frybread fried to order and heaps it with their signature carne asada, pinto beans, field greens, fresh pico de gallo, and sour cream; it is served with a side of mango and cucumber salsa and a lime wedge. They also serve street tacos and massive burritos.

Customers can expect dishes like hominy, mutton and green chile stew, pozole, and menudo to make appearances as specials.

Find out who the contenders were in the southeastern United States here!

Colorado: Quiero Arepas (Denver)

Igor Panasewicz was born in Maracaibo, Venezuela, where arepas are a staple. These unleavened patties of maize are cooked until golden on a griddle, split in half, and stuffed with ingredients. Though arepas are also popular in the Canary Islands, Panama, Puerto Rico, Colombia, and the Dominican Republic, it is the Venezuelan style that Panasewicz found himself craving in America. When he couldn’t find what he wanted, he and his wife Beckie opened a food truck, specializing in arepas made with clean, natural ingredients.

They try to have staples, but the menu does change daily. Many of the offerings are traditional, like La Original, which stuffs their discs of tender, fluffy masa with seasoned black beans, fresh avocado, and fried sweet plantains. Bonus: it’s also vegan.

The Pabellon is inspired by the second most popular Venezuelan dish, pabellon criollo. Beef is stewed in a savory broth and shredded before being added to the arepa with fried sweet plantains, cheese, and beans. But, there are also more unusual items, like El Caribe with locally smoked salmon, fresh avocado, cheese, and capers. And every arepa comes with their house cilantro and avocado sauce.

Ingredients matter to this mobile kitchen. Local farmers supply their produce, and the cheese comes from area cheesemakers. Their meats are also local and always natural. There are the obvious flavor benefits of using quality ingredients, but they are also committed to supporting the community by working with other small business owners. Their truck is a low-emission vehicle, powered by natural gas, and they try to remain as close to zero waste as possible, so don’t expect lids, plates, or utensils.

Nevada: Fukuburger (Las Vegas)

When former Tao servers, Robert “Mags” Magsalin and Colin Fukunaga launched Fukuburger, everyone told them it was a terrible idea. It was summer of 2010, and though food trucks were mad popular in California, that wasn’t the case in Vegas. However, burgers had been growing in popularity on the strip as culinary superstars like Huber Keller opened restaurants. Rather than discouraging them, the naysayers strengthened their vision of all-American burgers with a Japanese twist. It wasn’t an immediate hit; they had to depend on local foodies and hospitality staff as custmers for a long time, but they developed a cult following and established themselves as a Vegas essential.

The menu is straightforward and burger heavy. The house Fuku patty uses beef brought in fresh daily from their butcher; it’s marinated in a blend of soy sauce, lemon-pepper seasoning, and sesame oil before being hand formed into patties. The Fuku Burger, the classic, is uncomplicated, topping the patty with American cheese, pickled red onion, lettuce, and tomato before drizzling on some Fuku sauce.

All of their sauces are house-made, and many of them are top secret. But, the more creative Tamago Burger is not to be missed. The Fuku patty gets a furikake (a Japanese seasoning with seaweed, sugar, and salt) and teriyaki treatment before joining crispy onion strings and a fried egg on a buttered, toasted bun. The rich, decadent soft yolk is sublime, but the salty kick from the seasoning and the crunch from the onion are what puts it over the top. And, no meal is complete without Jazz fries: crispy garlic fries smothered with a ton of brown gravy and “crack sauce.”

Utah: Black’s Sliders (Salt Lake City)

Heather and Aaron Black arrived in Salt Lake City in July of 2012, having transplanted from Southern California a mere two days after tying the knot. Though they originally planned to return to SoCal after Heather finished her residency at the Veteran’s Administration, the area came to feel like home. Aaron committed himself to the local culinary scene, and the pair were settled and happy when, in 2014, Aaron was diagnosed with thyroid cancer. During treatment and recovery, he began re-evaluating his lifestyle, including the health of his diet. Those thoughts evolved into a business plan that would marry his passion for food with his commitment to community conscious consumerism. Soon, he was working to turn a stripped-down delivery truck he hauled back from Indiana into Black’s Sliders.

The food truck presents an uncomplicated menu that takes full advantage of seasonal ingredients and local products, including antibiotic- and hormone-free proteins. Heather and Aaron use Wasatch Meats, Stoneground Bakery, and farmer’s markets in the area. The most popular menu item is the Southern Fried Chicken Slider, which features a piece of dark meat chicken brined for 24 hours and seasoned with a secret family recipe before being fried to order and topped with romaine and house ranch. They also make a Soaker Slider with juicy, slow-roasted pulled pork soaked in a light vinegar-y BBQ sauce, slices of crisp Granny Smith apples, and a refreshing scratch coleslaw. The beef sliders come in classic and deluxe. Both feature sweet caramelized onions and sharp cheddar cheese, but the deluxe adds roma tomatoes and romaine lettuce to the party. The patties are flavorful, fresh, and juicy with a faultless sear. Customers can get fries with sea salt, Cajun fries, or fries with parmesan & herbs (truffle oil can be added on request). They are perfectly crispy and closer to shoestring size.

For more trucks that will make you plan a cross country road trip, check out our best of the northeast here!


This post first appeared on Meet The Cast Of The ‘Game Of Thrones’ Porn Pa, please read the originial post: here

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These Are The Best Food Trucks In Every Southwestern State

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