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Bottlecap Magnets with Mock Resin, 3 Ways (Kids Crafts) {tutorial}

How to Make Bottlecap Magnets (3 kid-friendly methods)

Perhaps you’ve seen resin pendants, or bottlecap Magnets made similarly with resin.  Resin is a bit tricky to work with (and toxic), so it isn’t a kid-friendly craft.  The versions of custom bottle cap magnets in this post give a similar look, but with safer, simpler methods that make for good kids craft projects.  If you’re looking for kids craft ideas for Christmas (or other gift-giving occasions, like Mothers Day or Fathers Day), these bottle cap magnets should fit the bill.

Supplies Needed for Bottlecap Magnets

bottlecap magnet supplies

For all options:

  • metal bottlecaps (Save them from actual bottles, or you can buy them if necessary.  Alternatively, use pendant bails.)
  • images to use inside
  • 1″ round punch (easiest) or scissors
  • glue (Tacky glue is the best compromise we’ve found between kid-friendly and effective.  You’ll see Elmer’s in some of the photos.  We started with that, but it doesn’t work.)
  • magnets, preferably “button” style (Ours were provided by CraftProjectIdeas.com.  These also look like an excellent option because they’re flatter, but I haven’t tried them so I can’t vouch for them.)

For most resin-like version (oldest kids):

  • ultra-thick clear embossing powder (Mine was an obscure off-brand, but Ranger is a quality brand.)
  • heat gun

For in-between version (middle kids and up):

  • Mod Podge Dimensional Magic

For easiest version (youngest kids and up):

  • 1″ clear epoxy stickers (Ours were provided by Oriental Trading Company.)

bottle caps for bottlecap magnets

Getting Started (all 3 methods)

making bottlecap magnets with kids

The first thing the kids need to do is cut their images into 1-inch circles.  If you have a punch with a lever (which takes less strength than a more traditional style punch), this is a much easier option for young kids especially, because it takes less skill.  But if you only have scissors, that will work, too.

If you’re using scissors, trace the flat side of the bottlecap onto your image and then cut just inside the line.

If you’re using a punch, turn it upside down before inserting the paper, and you’ll be able to see how your image lines up in the hole.

Then glue the image into the well of the bottlecap.  Try to encourage the kids not to use an excess of glue.

making bottlecap magnets with kids

making bottlecap magnets with kids

Let these dry before moving on to the “resin-y” steps.

(Some of our images are magazine pictures.  The others are printouts from Voice of the Martyrs, to make magnets as prayer reminders for persecuted Christians around the world.  Unfortunately, I can’t remember which document we printed them from.)

Method 1: Embossing Powder (for older kids)

Once the glued-in images are dry, you’re ready to apply the pseudo-resin layer.  This first method looks most similar to resin, but because of the heat, it’s not a good choice for younger kids.

Fill the bottlecap with a layer of embossing powder.  You do not need to “fill up” the cap.  (In fact, you probably don’t want to do that.)  You do need to have an uninterrupted layer.

bottlecap magnet with embossing powder (unmelted)

Make sure any spills are cleaned up before applying heat; you don’t want to melt embossing powder to your table!  Working on a piece of parchment or a craft mat is not a bad idea.  (Also, we learned the hard way that a plastic table isn’t the best work space for this.  The table melts!)

Then, use the heat gun to apply heat.  It works kind of like a hair dryer except it doesn’t blow.  Don’t put it too close.  This step requires some patience — and adult supervision, because the heat coming off this is hot.  You don’t want your hands in front of it, and you want to be careful touching the metal bottle cap after the heat gun has been directed at it.  (This isn’t so dangerous as to be panic-worthy or anything; just make sure your kids are old enough to use common sense caution.)

bottlecap magnets with embossing powder -- melting with a heat gun

bottlecap magnet with embossing powder (half-melted)

Keep applying heat until all of the embossing powder is completely melted.  It may not look completely clear.  Depending on your embossing powder, it might look a bit “frosty” while it’s melted.

When the embossing powder is completely melted, (carefully — remember it’s hot!) set the bottle cap(s) aside to cool and set up.

Method 2: Dimensional Magic (for middle kids)

This second method is a bit safer than the first, because it doesn’t use heat.  But it still can be slightly finicky, so I wouldn’t use it with the youngest kids.

After the images have been glued in and thoroughly dried, get out your Mod Podge Dimensional Magic.  This is a thick liquid.  Squeeze a layer of this liquid to completely coat the image in the bottle cap.  I like to start at an edge and slowly spiral in, or start in the center and spiral out.

Squeeze gently and steadily, because the only way you can really mess this up is by getting bubbles in the layer.  When you’re done, you can gently tap the bottle cap on the surface, if you like, to help settle everything into a smooth layer and help release any bubbles.

bottlecap magnet with embossing powder

Set the bottle cap(s) aside on a level surface to dry thoroughly.

Method 3: Epoxy Stickers (for everyone)

This last option is quick and simple and works for everyone — even preschoolers.

Once the images have been glued in and thoroughly dried, peel a clear epoxy sticker off its backing for each bottle cap.  Place it, sticky side down, into the bottle cap and press firmly to adhere.

epoxy stickers for bottlecap magnets

These are fairly stiff, so even young children should be able to get them lined up well, because they will only settle into the cap once they’re all the way in.  The youngest kids might need help peeling them off of the backing first, though.

making bottlecap magnets with kids

These need to be pressed in firmly to ensure they’re stuck, but don’t require time to dry before moving on to the next step.

Adding Magnets to the Bottle Caps (all methods)

Once the previous steps are complete, and the caps are thoroughly cooled or dried (if applicable), you’re ready to add magnets.

Flip the bottle caps over so they’re all facing down.

If you’re using the button magnets, add a dot of Tacky glue about half the size of a pea, then press the magnet into place.

A word of warning: because the bottle caps are metal, they’ll attract the magnets.  We didn’t think about this before trying to put the first one on, and it snapped to the back of the magnet before we had it lined up the way we wanted.  (That might be a good way to introduce kids to the concept of magnetism, though!)

I recommend that you hold the bottle cap with the glue on it in one hand and the magnet in the other so you can guide it into place as it “snaps” on.  Then press gently to ensure it’s making good contact with the glue.

Once again, let these sit until they’re thoroughly dry.  (I’d leave them upside-down while they dry, rather than trying to flip them over yet.)

bottlecap magnets

Presentation Ideas for Bottle Cap Magnets

24 Pack Metal Rectangular Empty Hinged Tins24 Pack Metal Rectangular Empty Hinged Tins24 Pack Metal Rectangular Empty Hinged TinsThe Display Guys Pack of 25 Cotton Filled Cardboard Paper White Jewelry BoxesThe Display Guys Pack of 25 Cotton Filled Cardboard Paper White Jewelry BoxesThe Display Guys Pack of 25 Cotton Filled Cardboard Paper White Jewelry BoxesChristmas Gift Card Tin Holders with Insert and Card (8)Christmas Gift Card Tin Holders with Insert and Card (8)Christmas Gift Card Tin Holders with Insert and Card (8)Juvale Thank You Tin Box (5 Pack) 5 x 3.7 x .7 InchesJuvale Thank You Tin Box (5 Pack) 5 x 3.7 x .7 InchesJuvale Thank You Tin Box (5 Pack) 5 x 3.7 x .7 Inches

At the beginning of this post, I noted that these bottle cap magnets make good kids craft ideas for Christmas, Mothers Day, Fathers Day (teacher appreciation, birthdays, etc.).  If you’re giving them as gifts, you’ll want to present them nicely.

Two (lined up) to three (staggered) will fit nicely in an Altoid or similar tin.  These are handy because the magnets will stick right to the tin so they don’t slide around.

Jewelry-style cardboard gift boxes are also a viable option.  A box measuring a little more than 2×3 will accommodate a half-dozen magnets.

Gift card tins are a viable option if you’ve used flat magnets on the backs, but may or may not be deep enough if you’ve used button magnets.  Like mint tins, these have the advantage of enabling the magnets to stick directly to the tin.  (They also come pre-decorated for gift-giving, and often with cards!)

How to Make Bottlecap Magnets (3 kid-friendly methods)

How to Make Bottlecap Magnets (3 kid-friendly methods)

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Bottlecap Magnets with Mock Resin, 3 Ways (Kids Crafts) {tutorial} is a post from: Titus 2 Homemaker


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Bottlecap Magnets with Mock Resin, 3 Ways (Kids Crafts) {tutorial}

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