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Is There a Generic Cialis?

While multiple Generic drugmakers produce lower-priced generic formulations of the popular erectile dysfunction drug Cialis, those substitutes for the branded drug are available only in countries where the patent on Cialis has expired.

As of July 2017, no generic version of Cialis was being legally marketed in the United States.

Eli Lilly & Company, the pharmaceuticals giant that holds the patents on Cialis, currently has five Cialis patents on file with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Of the five, one expires in late 2017, and the other four expire in 2020. At least two generic companies, eager to offer their generic versions of Cialis to U.S. consumers are engaged in legal battles with Lilly, which contends that its market exclusivity extends until the 2020 patents expire.

Generic Wannabes See It Differently

Lilly’s would-be generic competitors are arguing just as vehemently that they should be allowed to begin selling generic Cialis to American consumers in late 2017 when the earlier patent on the drug expires. These legal battles — one before a district court in Virginia and the other before the Patent Trial and Appeal Board — are ongoing as this is written, so it is not yet possible to predict when generic Cialis will go on sale in the United States.

As is customary with most popular prescription drugs, generic drugmakers usually file abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs) with the Food and Drug Administration well in advance of the applicable patent expiration dates. The FDA checks these generic replications of the brand-name drug and if those generics pass muster, they are given conditional approvals. The condition, of course, is that they cannot be marketed until the patent on the brand-name drug expires.

Generic Cialis Available Outside US

Meanwhile, generic versions of Cialis — sold as tadalafil, the active ingredient in the popular erectile dysfunction drug — are readily available in multiple foreign countries where Lilly’s patents on the drug have expired. However, Americans who think they might be able to snag a few bottles of the drug during a foreign visit or through an offshore-based online pharmacy should be aware that such importations are technically illegal.

The FDA regulations governing the importation of prescription drugs by individuals allow such imports only under limited circumstances, such as those listed here:

  • The drug being imported is for the treatment of a serious medical condition for which no effective form of treatment is available domestically through clinical or commercial means.
  • The imported medication is not being commercialized or promoted to persons living within the United States.
  • The imported drug poses no unreasonable risk.
  • The consumer affirms in writing that the imported drug is for personal use only.
  • The quantity of the drug imported does not exceed a three-month supply.
  • The individual importing the drug must provide the name and address of the U.S. physician who will oversee the individual’s treatment with the drug. Alternatively, the individual can supply evidence that the drug being imported is a continuation of medical treatment that began outside the country and is to be continued once the patient returns home.

Imports Technically Illegal

Because Cialis, as well as other popular ED drugs such as Viagra and Cialis, are readily available in the United States, the importation of generic versions from abroad clearly violates the first regulation cited above. While it is true that U.S. Customs agents often look the other way when small quantities (up to 90 days’ worth) of innocuous prescription drugs are imported, such imports remain technically illegal. So if you plan to bring such drugs back into the country after a foreign visit, you’d better hope that the customs agent inspecting your baggage is in a beneficent mood when he discovers those drugs in your suitcase or carry-on bag.

If you’re thinking about ordering generic Cialis from an online supplier, be advised that you’re taking a major risk. Even if the medication shipped to you is the real thing, it would still be subject to seizure in violation of FDA’s rules governing the importation of prescription drugs by individuals. However, the vast majority of online drug vendors that are based outside the United States are unreliable and may well supply counterfeit medications that, at the very least, are ineffective but, in the worst-case scenario, could contain toxic ingredients.

Dangers of Buying Drugs Online

The National Association of Boards of Pharmacy has investigated more than 11,500 online drug outlets. Of those, it has found 96 percent “to be operating in conflict with pharmacy laws and practice standards.”

Until generic Cialis becomes legally available in the United States — any time from late 2017 to 2020 — your best bet is to purchase the branded drug here in the United States, either from a local pharmacy or a trustworthy online supplier, such as eDrugstore.com.

Generic Viagra Is Due Soon

If you are not totally wedded to Cialis but are willing to try other ED drugs, generic Viagra is scheduled to make its bow in December 2017. Although its effects are not as long lasting as those of Cialis, its substantially lower price might well tempt you to make the switch.

If, however, you’d like to stick with Cialis but prefer the convenience of ordering online, eDrugstore makes the process about as easy as it gets. If you have a doctor’s prescription, you can fax it or scan and email it along with your order. Alternatively, you can ask eDrugstore to arrange a complimentary online consultation with one of its team of licensed U.S. physicians who can authorize a prescription if your symptoms and overall medical history deem it appropriate. To get started, click below to access eDrugstore’s ED Medication Guide.



This post first appeared on Edrugstore.com Blog | Current Health News, please read the originial post: here

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Is There a Generic Cialis?

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