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To make their life in the country better

“The first session of the John C. Campbell Folk School at Brasstown, N.C. is scheduled for this winter,” says the October 1927 brochure. “It will begin December 1st and cover the months of December, January and February. The course is open to all sixteen years and over, regardless of the number of grades they have passed, who are really interested in continuing their education and in developing the best they have in them. There are, therefore, no stated requirements beyond a serious desire to learn and grow.

“Subjects to be given fall into different groups: simple field-surveying, construction of model farm equipment, such as colony hog houses according to Government blue-print; cooking and sewing; grammar, reading, writing and arithmetic of the most practical kind; lectures in History, literature, economic geography, natural history, civil government and health; daily music, Danish gymnastics and sports. An opportunity for special group study of agricultural science, book-keeping and forestry will be offered to those interested.

“No examinations or credits will be given for this course, which is not intended to fit for particular trades, or to prepare for the graded school or college. It is designed to help young people take advantage of their natural powers and to make their life in the Country better, more efficient and more interesting.

“Inquiries may be made in person at the school or addressed to Mrs. John C. Campbell, Brasstown, N.C.”

source: wcudigitalcollection.cdmhost.com/index.php

related post: ‘The Vardy School’

John+C.+Campbell+Folk+School Brasstown+NC appalachia appalachia+history appalachian+culture appalachian+history appalachian+mountains+history

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