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January Blues? Maybe It’s Time to Quit Your Job

Are the January blues hitting you hard? If that negative back-to-work feeling you thought would pass hasn’t let up, it might be time to Quit your job.

Last Monday the world faced the most depressing day of the year: Blue Monday. Whether you believe the day is true or just a load of bogus science, there’s no denying that January can be a hard month for everyone. With longer nights combined with bad weather and the fact that just about everyone is skint, your mental health can suffer. But, it might not just be the weather that’s making you feel sad, it could be your job.

Everyone faces low points in their career but if while reading this you identify with everything, we suggest talking to your manager first to see if together you can solve the issues. If however you don’t believe your manager can offer you any constructive help, you should seriously consider quitting your job. Search through our latest specialists jobs to find your dream role.

1. Stop and Evaluate

Have you been evaluating whether your job/company is really for you over the festive break? You’re not alone. Moorepay found that during 46% of employees in SMEs look for a new job in January. After all, January is when most employees feel demotivated and fed up at work. If you face the Sunday blues every week, you should be taking a hard look at your job. While a little bit of Sunday night blues are normal, if the thought of Monday make you anxious for the week ahead it’s probably time to quit your job. Don’t wait for the weekend to free you from work, free yourself now.

2. Don’t Get Stuck in a Rut

Do you get excited for a coffee break just so you have a few minutes to yourself? Do you take a sigh of relief every time you see the office empty? The company culture might not be for you. It’s easy to dismiss frustrating colleagues, weak company culture, and nagging bosses, but don’t get stuck in a rut where the annoyances become the norm.  You might believe that every company will have an aspect of the culture you dislike, but that’s not necessarily true. Company culture is increasingly important which means its much easier to find a company that fits with your values. So don’t put up with a culture that doesn’t reflect who you are, take the leap and quit your job.

3. Chase Your Dreams (No, Really)

When faced with the reality that your job might not be for you can be daunting. You might be thinking, what are the next steps? Well, firstly you need to remind yourself that scary is excited. Utilise the fear of uncertainty to chase your dreams. It might sound cliché and, to be honest, it is but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t try. Stop feeling ‘comfortable’ in your job, it’s not always a positive feeling. Comfort can lead to complacency. Find a challenging role that let’s your creativity and potential flourish.

4. Keep Trying

Once you’ve realised you’re dissatisfied, it’s time to quit your job. Remember that quitting doesn’t equal failure. Taking action when you know your time is up is commendable and it is certainly not a risky move for the rest of your career, quite the opposite actually. Quitting your job is the first step and after that you’re likely to face another stressful step; job hunting. Searching for the perfect job can be hard, but remind yourself that the move towards a new career is almost always positive. After all, you’ll never know if you never try.

If you think it’s time for you to quit your job, search through our latest IT, Engineering, and Public Sector roles. Alternatively, have a confidential chat with one of our specialist that can help you navigate your next career move.

The post January Blues? Maybe It’s Time to Quit Your Job appeared first on ISL Recruitment.



This post first appeared on The ISL Recruitment, please read the originial post: here

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January Blues? Maybe It’s Time to Quit Your Job

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