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Beers For Diabetics

NOTE: This article is by no means an endorsement for consuming alcohol. Every person with diabetes should check with his or her healthcare professional about the use of alcohol. In addition to the effects of alcohol on diabetes control, including potentially causing hypoglycemia, there are possible interactions with other medications.

Helpful Hints if You are Going to Drink

Drinking alcohol can increase your risk of having Low Blood Glucose (sugar). To reduce this risk, take the following steps:

BEFORE drinking alcohol

  • Eat regular meals, take your medication(s), and check your blood glucose (sugar) levels frequently (keep your blood glucose meter with you).
  • Always have a treatment for low blood glucose (sugar) with you (such as three glucose tablets or ¾ cup regular pop or six Life Savers®).
  • Wherever you are, make sure someone with you knows your signs and symptoms of low blood glucose (sugar) and how to treat it so they can help you.
  • Be aware that glucagon, a treatment for low blood glucose, will not work while alcohol is in the body. Because of this, make sure that someone knows to call an ambulance if you pass out.
  • Wear diabetes identification such as a MedicAlert® bracelet.

WHILE drinking alcohol

  • Eat carbohydrate-rich foods when drinking alcohol.
  • Eat extra carbohydrate-rich foods if you are dancing, playing sports or doing other physical activity.
  • Always pour your own drinks. Use less alcohol and stretch your drinks with sugar-free mixes.
  • Drink slowly. Make your second drink without alcohol.

AFTER drinking alcohol

  • Tell a responsible person that you have been drinking. They should look for low blood glucose (sugar) symptoms.
  • Check your blood glucose (sugar) before going to bed. Eat a carbohydrate snack if your blood glucose (sugar) is lower than usual.
  • Set an alarm or have a responsible person wake you up through the night and early morning – a delayed low blood glucose (sugar) can occur anytime up to 24 hours after drinking alcohol.
  • You need to get up on time the next day for any food, medication or insulin you normally take. Missed medication or insulin can lead to high blood glucose (sugar), ketones and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA).


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NOTE: This article is by no means an endorsement for consuming alcohol. Every person with diabetes should check with his or her healthcare professional about the use of alcohol. In addition to the effects of alcohol on diabetes control, including potentially causing hypoglycemia, there are possible interactions with other medications.

The post Beers For Diabetics appeared first on Spinning Media.



This post first appeared on Spinning Media, please read the originial post: here

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