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Rugged Intensity

The Saffron Walden Reporter talks about the recent appearance of The Unthanks in the Cambridge Folk Festival:

It is a wonderful sound. Their stories and songs make people laugh and cry. Adrian [McNally] had been asked by the Brontë Society in Haworth to put music to one of Emily Brontë's poems.
"The night is darkening around me. The loud winds coldly blow. But a tyrant's spell has bound me. And I cannot, cannot go." (Angela Singer)
The Herald reviews the Reuben Kaye show at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival:
Reuben Kaye, Assembly Checkpoint, 21:30, 31 Jul - 25 Aug
The show’s centrepiece, a reworking of Kate Bush’s Wuthering Heights into a tale of violently unrequited schoolboy crush manages to be both deeply disturbing and very funny[.] (Rob Adams)
BBC America's Anglophenia recommends the Anything but Silent podcast:
Launched in May by the world-famous British Library, this fortnightly podcast aims to show libraries are dynamic places that are “anything but silent.” So far, individual episodes have explored everything from James Baldwin’s 1956 novel Giovanni’s Room to Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel Jane Eyre, the drag kings and queens holding story hours sessions in today’s libraries, and what is billed as the “world’s best collection of forbidden books.” It’s an admirably varied and unstuffy approach which means most listeners should find something to pique their curiosity. (Nick Levine)
San Francisco Classical Voice reviews the opera If I Were You by Jake Heggie and Gene Scheer:
The phrase “If I were you ...” might imply advice from Miss Manners about how to handle a touchy social situation. But it also signals a darker impulse: to be someone other than who we are, to shape-shift. It’s a meme that has driven Romantic fiction from Faust and Wuthering Heights to the Harry Potter novels and zombie films. (Nicholas Jones)
Owlnation reviews the novel The Bookshop on the Shore by Jenny Colgan:
At first, Mrs. MacGlone seems much like, as is compared to Mrs. Danvers from Daphne du Maurier’s classic Gothic novel, Rebecca. Other similar elements are the large, spooky house with a secret tragedy and a lost wife, and a man who spends much time hidden away in his library. Another Gothic novel referenced is Jane Eyre, when the characters in this novel speak about keeping a wife in the attic. (Amanda Leitch)
Wired recommends the film God's Own Country:
This stunning debut from writer and director Francis Lee, who himself grew up in Yorkshire before turning to acting, won the Sundance Film Festival's world cinema directing award, and recalls the rugged intensity of Andrea Arnold's 2011 Wuthering Heights.
Telegraf (Serbia) lists great novels that were not well received by critics when first published:
Orkanski visovi – Emili Brontë
Ocenjen kao čudan i depresivan, roman "Orkanski visovi" je veoma slabo dočekan, a neki su išli toliko daleko da su predlagali da se spali. (Translation)
Bookriot includes Jane Eyre on a list of historical thrillers. unlibrotiralaltroovveroilpassaparoladeilibri (in Italian) reviews The Tenant of Wildfell Hall. Dreaming and Reading reviews Wuthering Heights. Alys Bookland posts about the Manga edition of Jane Eyre.


This post first appeared on BrontëBlog, please read the originial post: here

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Rugged Intensity

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