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Chamber Jane

Jane Eyre musical:

Why is CMT doing the script? Sternfeld shared, “I was actually unfamiliar with the piece. I was working with a student on one of the show’s songs and immediately fell in love with the music. I was intrigued and started to dig into the novel. I realized after reading the original play script that it would benefit from doing a smaller version of the show. I contacted the original writers and they were keen to revise the show as a chamber version. We had a reading in New York, followed by a developmental lab in Cleveland, and are now holding Cleveland and New York auditions for the full production.”
“We will continue to work on the piece during the Cleveland run, but the majority of the structural changes and new songs were done during our readings and labs.”
The Cleveland production, which will run from Fri 8/31-Sun 9/9, will have a cast of 10. It will feature direction by Sternfeld, music supervision-orchestrations by Brad Haak, choreography by Martin Céspedes, scenic design by Gabriel Firestone, costume design by Sydney Gallas, lighting design by Benjamin Gantose, sound design by Carlton Guc, and casting by Jamibeth Margolis.
Where does Jane Eyre go after Cleveland?
“We have lots of ideas. There is some interest from commercial producers to remount the piece. Streaming is also a possibility but no decision has been made yet. Regardless, the show will be re-licensed and become the new version.” (Roy Berko)
The Huddersfield Daily Examiner mentions this again:
Former piggery linked to the Brontës to become plush £100k offices
Strategic brand consultancy The Engine Room has bought York Mills in Mirfield (...)
ork Mills in York Road has a connection to the Bronte family.
The building was once owned by the Ingham family who lived in nearby Blake Hall and employed Anne Brontë as a governess for their children.
It is believed the site also previously housed a textile mill and confectionery warehouse. Outbuildings have already been cleared to pave the way for a car park, the former car port is being converted into a main reception, and an adjoining cottage has quickly been let. (Martin Shaw)
The Wall Street Journal reviews the book The Victorian and the Romantic by Nell Stevens:
In 1857, Gaskell, the middle-aged wife of a Unitarian minister in Manchester, traveled to Rome with two of her daughters to to give herself a vacation after writing what turned out to be a ground-breaking biography of her recently deceased friend Charlotte Brontë. (Alexandra Mullen)
Brightest Youngthings reviews the Off-Broadway production of Stephen Sondheim's Passion:
Fosca looks and acts like she wandered in from a Brontë novel — down to the imperious black hairdo. (Tristan Lejeune)
Myanmar Times (Burma) reminisces about a teashop (now gone) which was a rendezvous place of writers:
Teashops are the rendezvous for them. At first, there was “ShweKyiAye” teashop in 1980’s, then “Lay Htan Kone” “Wuthering Heights” teashop appeared around 1985’s and disappeared in 2014, and then “Lay En Kone” came into existence. (San Lin Tun)
Tiscali (Italy) reviews the film Tulip Fever:
L’amore e la passione sono temi centrali del film La ragazza dei tulipani e che ricorrono in molti altri bellissimi film in costume di ieri e di oggi, storie d’amore ambientate nel passato che abbiamo amato e che nel tempo continuano a farci emozionare: a partire da Anna Karenina a Jane Eyre, da La Duchessa ad Orgoglio e pregiudizio fino a Shakespeare in love e L'eta dell'innocenza. E ancora molti altri. (Translation)
Carmilla Magazine (Italy) reviews L’Arminuta, by Donatella Di Pietrantonio:
La ragazzina tredicenne, che sopporta tutto in silenzio, con dignità, proprio come la moglie comprata da Martinon; la ragazzina che combatte con lo studio, diventando una studentessa modello, la sua unica ancora di salvezza: come può non evocare Jane Eyre? (Mauro Baldrati) (Translation)
Thomas Chatterton And The Brontë Connection on AnneBronte.org.


This post first appeared on BrontëBlog, please read the originial post: here

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