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How bad a boyfriend is Heathcliff?

Financial Times reviews I am Heathcliff, edited by Kate Moss:
Byronic hero, or bad boyfriend?
Wuthering Heights’ is reassessed for the #MeToo era in a new anthology
Ardent Emily Brontë fans will recognise the title of this anthology from the declaration of love in a seminal scene in Wuthering Heights. It comes as Catherine Earnshaw justifies her decision to marry the tame but wealthy Edgar Linton over her soulmate, Heathcliff, sealing the fate of the wild, windswept lovers at the book’s heart.
“I am Heathcliff!” she says, “He’s always, always in my mind: not as a pleasure, any more than I am always a pleasure to myself, but as my own being.” This quasi-spiritual bond has, ever since, set the benchmark for a certain kind of all-consuming love in fiction. But how does it resonate today? And while the brooding, Byronic figure of Heathcliff has fuelled the infatuations of legions of teenagers, just how bad a boyfriend is he in an age of #MeToo?
These are some of the questions that the 16 stories in this anthology implicitly ask of Brontë’s only novel, written in 1847, a year before her death, and brought back to the spotlight in this bicentenary year of her birth — if it was ever out of it. (Read more)  (Arifa Akbar)
Also in the Financial Times, a review of the novel All Among the Barley by Melissa Harrison:
Tess of the d’Urbervilles and Charlotte Brontë’s Shirley often came to my mind as I read All Among the Barley. Edie’s stops and starts, her passivity and the way she often seems to go against the grain of herself, also conjured a more recent heroine, the young woman in Colm Tóibín’s Brooklyn. (Susie Boyt)
The Washington Post talks about Vanessa Zoltan and her readings of popular novels as sacred texts:
Culturally Jewish and a self-identified atheist, Zoltan herself could be a poster child for the new millennial brand of spirituality.
At Harvard, she studied Charlotte Brontë’s “Jane Eyre” as a sacred text. Then she co-founded “Harry Potter and the Sacred Text,” a podcast exploring the meaning of friendship, power, grief, integrity and other themes through the J.K. Rowling novels. (Kimberly Winston)
The Guardian recommends Balls by Lily Cole at the Foundling Museum:
English literature is full of foundlings, from Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones to Emily Brontë‘s Heathcliff. It’s the latter whose fictional story is juxtaposed with the real lives of children who grew up in London’s Foundling Hospital in a new film by model-turned-creative polymath Lily Cole. Objects from the Brontë Parsonage Museum are also on view. ( Damon Wise, Michael Cragg, John Fordham, Andrew Clements, Jonathan Jones, Mark Cook and Judith Mackrell)
The Times visits Penzance in Cornwall:
In the town, historic Chapel Street is lined with elegant Georgian architecture, and it was here that fishermen spread the word on victory in the battle of Trafalgar, as well as Nelson’s death. The mother of the Brontë sisters lived at No 25. (Laura Whateley)
Eastern Daily Press comments on the new Workers’ Educational Association (WEA) autumn programme:
The Norwich branch of WEA has published its new brochure for courses and day schools for 2018-19.
The Brontës, sixties British cinema, and the UK constitution are all subjects covered in the new Workers’ Educational Association (WEA) autumn programme. (Sophie Smith)
Romantic places in Derbyshire on Derbyshire Live:
It's hard to say which is the most romantic as everyone will have their favourites but if you want to get that Jane Austen/Brontë sisters feeling then Haddon Hall is a good choice. It's been used as a location for three versions of Jane Eyre and screen credits include Elizabeth, Pride and Prejudice, The Other Boleyn Girl and The Princess Bride. (Jill Gallone and Rachel Sloper)
Film School Rejects reviews the TV series Preacher:
Considering Jesse is the double whammy of childhood first love and Byronic-type hero, Tulip O’Hare is definitely in a ride-or-die situation, as mandated by the laws of narrative tropes that have existed since the 19th century (thanks for that, Wuthering Heights). (Ciara Wardlow)
Diablo Magazine interviews the singer-songwriter Nicki Bluhm:
Deborah Kirk: Where do you turn for inspiration?
N.B.: I get a lot of my ideas walking in nature, when I can get away from technology and let my mind wander. I also like to get lost in reading fiction. I love character studies that shed light on why we behave the way we do. I also think there’s a kind of comfort in storytelling, in the sharing of and retelling of our stories. Right now, I’m reading books by Charlotte Brontë. It’s cool to find parallels that still feel potent today.
An alert in Sovana, Italy:
Nuovo appuntamento per Sovana in Arte, la rassegna, organizzata dall’associazione “I sogni in teatro” con la direzione artistica di Francesca Ventura, giunta alla sua decima edizione ed ospitata all’interno e nel giardino di uno dei palazzi storici più affascinanti del territorio: palazzo Bourbon del Monte.
Domani, sabato 25 agosto, è in programma “Letteratura in lettura”, serata dedicata interamente a Emily Brontë: alle 21,30, nel salone del palazzo, Federica Marchetti, curatrice della serata, introdurrà l’autrice, la cui lettura è affidata a Giuseppe Renzo, Francesca Ventura e Miryam Jacomini, che leggeranno brani tratti da Cime Tempestose. (Il Giunco)
Misiones (Argentina) recommends books for El Día del Lector:
Uno de los libros recomendados para adquirir el Día del Libro tenía que ser de ella, Emily Brontë. La autora de ‘Cumbres borrascosas’, uno de los grandes clásicos de la literatura romántica, tenía en realidad una única pasión: la poesía. Este libro recopila sus poemas, obras poderosas y apasionadas que combinan la vitalidad del espíritu humano con el mundo natural. (Translation)
In Morón (Argentina) we have another alert:
15h CHARLAS: Mujeres del Romanticismo, contra viento y marea: Mary Shelley y Emily Brontë. Con Luis Chitarroni y Laura Ramos. Modera: Sofía González Bonorin. Sala recinto del Concejo Deliberante (Almirante Brown 946). (Zona Norte Visión)
A Twitter thread by the Spanish writer Nando J. López, summarizes literature classics:
 Una mujer que lucha contra la adversidad (Jane Eyre)
Un lugar envenenado por pasiones violentas (Cumbres Borrascosas) (Translation)
Con Tinta y Letras (in Spanish) and Pages Unbound Reviews posts about  Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights respectively.


This post first appeared on BrontëBlog, please read the originial post: here

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How bad a boyfriend is Heathcliff?

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