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How to Be More Successful and Lucky

Our first grade classroom photo was taken on St. Patrick’s Day. I was the only one who wasn’t decked out in green that day. Mom had just made me a beautiful red and white dress, and I guess that seemed like a better choice for such a formal photo.

Guess who got pinched that day? Guess who stood out in the photo?

Maybe this was an early hint of rebellion.

Or maybe I didn’t believe that I would really have bad Luck if I didn’t wear green. After all, I had been pretty darned lucky to that point.

©Michaela Laurie, Let’s Climb Those Trees and See the View. Colored pencil on paper, 70 centimeters diameter. Used with permission.

©Michaela Laurie, Let’s Climb Those Trees and See the View. Colored pencil on paper, 70 centimeters diameter. Used with permission.

I was lucky to have been born into a healthy, loving family that always had plenty of food on the table. I was lucky to be in a safe school where parents cared about a decent education for their children – an education that eludes so much of the world’s population.

Later, I would be lucky to have a higher education and the continued support of my parents along the way.

What I did with that luck was up to me.

Luck had little to do with the success of my business, and it has little to do with the success of your art career regardless of whether you feel lucky, were born into luck, or are convinced you are unlucky.

I’m fond of quoting what our third president had to say about luck:

I’m a great believer in luck, and I find the harder I work the more I have of it.
― Thomas Jefferson

When you work hard and take action toward your goals, you put yourself in a better position for luck to find you.

Why Some Artists Seem Luckier Than You

Have you ever observed that many artists whose work is on par with your own seem to have luck on their side? Chances are good that they worked for that luck.

I’ve included here a few of the reasons for their good fortune so you can emulate their success and duplicate their luck.

They know what they want and why they want it.

Get very clear on the vision you have for your one precious life. Don’t let anyone else decide your path or tell your story.

©Christine O’Brien, Beaded. Oil on linen, 24 x 30 inches. Used with permission.

©Christine O’Brien, Beaded. Oil on linen, 24 x 30 inches. Used with permission.

They work hard.

Many pursue an Art Career because of their passion for art. Few understand what is required to turn that passion into a successful career and profitable business.

Make sure you are prepared for this, and then roll up your sleeves and get to work. Every. Single. Day. Just like Mr. Jefferson.

They take themselves seriously.

No one will treat you as a professional artist until you treat yourself as one.

Be serious about making art and be serious about sharing that art with the rest of the world.

They challenge themselves. They know that confronting these challenges leads to growth.

Challenge yourself in your artmaking, in your marketing, and in your business evolution. If it’s too easy, it probably isn’t worth pursuing.

This brings me to …

They embrace rejections and failures. Rejections and failures are a valuable part of a creative life worth living.

The more rejections you have under your belt, the better your chances of finding the right fit. Likewise, the more you fail, the closer you will get to your goals.

They accept 100% responsibility for their success. They don’t waste energy on whining and complaining about the tough breaks. They take action to improve future results.

As noted above, you will have many rejections along the way. You can’t control what happens to you, but you can control how you respond.

They’re persistent. They fall down, dust themselves off, and get back to work. The only other option is to give up on your dreams.

Know that the universe wants you to succeed. I do, too.

©Norma Jean Moore, Springtide Harmonics. Acrylic on canvas, 24 x 36 inches. Used with permission.

©Norma Jean Moore, Springtide Harmonics. Acrylic on canvas, 24 x 36 inches. Used with permission.

They celebrate their wins. Whether it’s with a coach, on social media, or to a spouse, they acknowledge the good stuff.

Don’t belittle your accomplishments by saying you’re lucky. You earned it!

They exercise gratitude. They might keep a formal gratitude journal or seek out recipients for special thank-yous and gifts.

Learn to be grateful for all you have – especially when you’re frustrated or rejected. You won’t get more of the good stuff until you appreciate your current abundance.

If you practice all of the above on a regular basis, I’m certain that good luck will find you.

I’ll still be wearing green tomorrow. Why risk it? Besides, I like green.

Your Turn

Are you lucky?
Have you ever turned what you thought was bad luck into a success?



This post first appeared on Art Biz, please read the originial post: here

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How to Be More Successful and Lucky

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