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Nymphenburg Palace Garden Canal


By: Jacob Hawthorne

Gallery: Schmidt Fine Art Gallery


The Nymphenburg Palace Garden Canal by Chalbaud captures the lush, pristine gardens of the Nymphenburg Palace Park found in Munich, Germany, which is regarded as one of the best and most significant works of garden design in Germany. This Nymphenburg Summer Residence of Bavarian dukes and kings is located in the modern Munich Neuhausen-Nymphenburg borough, and it is home to glorious palace buildings and royal entry ways as well as the wide-spread and massive park landscapes in which it is known for, including the Garden parterre with its winding water features.

 

Chalbaud’s photographic pieces focus mainly on nature, such as landscapes or closeups of flora and fauna, like leaves or flowers or animals, and water is also often a focal point. She explains, “When it comes to the water, growing up in Venezuela, I had the Caribbean at my back door. I lived about 40 minutes from the beach, so just anything that has to do with water, I’m in.” This love for water scenes manifested itself in a certain photo she took during a journey to Belize as well as here in the Nymphenburg Palace Garden Canal.


The formal gardens and English-style country park is truly a masterpiece of garden design, and as such has been a popular attraction for local residents and tourists alike. These German designs for the gardens were largely based on the French gardens at Vaux-le-Vicomte and Versailles. The park layout that you see today is actually a redesign by Friedrich Ludwig Sckell in 1799, and the area of the park inside the garden walls is approximately 180 hectares, while the complex overall is approximately 229 hectares. Let’s introduce the various gardens found on site.


The Garden parterre is found on the garden side of the palace and is a visible feature near the French garden. In 1815, the palace park underwent a massive redesign by Sckell to simplify the structure but retain its original size, and in so doing the six-part broderie parterre became a four-part lawn with a flower border. When divided into a four-part field, the eastern parts that face the palace are much longer than the western parts, which creates additional depth of space when seen from the palace staircases.


The English-style landscape garden takes up the most land area of the Nymphenburg Palace Garden. The northern section of the landscape garden boasts panoramic views of the Pagodenburg Lake and the Pagodenburg valley, complete with a meadow valley that runs to the north with a flowing brook that leads into the Kugelweiher pond. The southern section of the landscape garden holds more panoramic views of the massive Badenburg Lake, and it lets visitors view the water surface at the Apollo temple and the Badenburg.


The rectangular Crown Prince’s Garden is the first work of Friedrich Ludwig Sckell in Nymphenburg. This German garden designer created this moderate garden in 1799 and used the already existing English garden-style characteristics. 


Three decorative gardens lie north of the Garden parterre. Friedrich Ludwig Sckell designed these decorative gardens between 1810 and 1820 to serve as formal, regular structures meant to contrast the landscape park.


The North Cabinet Garden is a small garden that is one of the oldest, yet still structurally intact elements of the Nymphenburg park.  It is also known as the Imperial Garden due to its immediate vicinity near Prince-elector Karl Albrecht's rooms, where he stayed during his time as Charles VII (Holy Roman Emperor from 1742–45). This garden, along with the South Cabinet Garden are secret gardens (gardini segreti), because they served as a private place of recluse for the summer guests. The concept of a secret garden is rooted in 15th/16th century Renaissance northern Italy. Before its redesign by Friedrich Ludwig Sckell, the South Cabinet Garden looked very similar to the North Cabinet Garden.


Maximilian II Emanuel, Elector of Bavaria of the Wittelsbach family was born in 1662, and this was marked as the occasion to construct a palace and garden dedicated to the young mother, Electoress Henriette Adelaide of Savoy. The foundation stone was laid in 1664 with the construction of a cube-shaped palace building as well as the Garden parterre to the west. The actual living quarters known as the Baroque palace complex was finished a generation later when Maximilian II Emanuel reached adulthood, at which point the palace would serve as a summer residence and alternative to the seat of government, the Munich Residenz.


Whether you are an aspiring photographer or an art collector in search of inspiring works to fill your home or canvas, Schmidt Fine Art Gallery is here to service you. We are a gallery for the artist by the artist. Our mission is to serve as the place for artists to simply sell art, without the overburdening of promotion, marketing and running a start-up business. We are committed to producing high-quality, museum grade products and timeless works of art on canvases that can be enjoyed for generations to come.


Nymphenburg Palace Garden Canal by Chalbaud is available in all sizes and formats.  You can pick your own frame, Finish, and finish on this piece in our customization shop.


Schmidt Gallery was founded by Kurt Schmidt with the vision to establish a photo-centric gallery in the heart of Montgomery county, Texas. Although it is all run online at the moment, Schmidt Gallery has dreams of opening up a brick and mortar gallery in The Woodlands just north of Houston. Schmidt Fine Art Gallery was founded in March 2020 as a startup funded by All ARK LLC. 






This post first appeared on Conversations About Art, please read the originial post: here

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